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Wednesday, December 1, 2010

The Shoes of Teens

Whether you are the parent of a teen or a young adult author, it pays to know what teens are thinking. Yesterday, on my Internet home page, an interesting article popped up about this topic. It has no writing tips (sorry), but it does give us a little glimpse of the teen mind (which is always helpful when writing about teenagers). So, today's Wednesday's Website can be accessed here. I have to admit, even though I have three teens, I was educated on what they might be thinking. For me, it was a bonus read as a writer and as a parent. Enjoy!

16 comments:

Corey Schwartz said...

Hi Susan,
Sorry to hear about your dad. Hope he is doing better!
C

Girl in My Own World said...

The funny thing about that article is that I still feel that way when it comes to some of my older relatives and I am 30. lol. :o)

Carol Riggs said...

Good article! Great stuff to remember when writing a young adult novel, too--places where conflict can arise.

Amy Tate said...

Great information! I think listening is so important and for me, it's hard to hold my tongue sometimes. I needed that reminder! Thanks so much for sharing that!

Patti said...

Very interesting. I can definitely see glimpses of that in my teenage son, especially the, sometimes they just want you to listen and not nag. I have to catch myself.

Kathi Oram Peterson said...

Thanks for the tip! I'll hop over and take a look.

Shannon Whitney Messenger said...

Okay, first--new follower! *waves* Not sure how I've missed your blog all this time, but I've fixed the problem now! :)

Second, thanks for this link. Such an interesting article--and you're right, it's so important to know the minds of our characters!

Melissa said...

Thank you for this link! Going to check it out now.

Melissa said...

Sounds cool. Thanks for the linkage

K. M. Walton said...

Definitely worth the read as a YA writer AND parent. Thanks for the link, Susan!! Always interesting over here!

Stina Lindenblatt said...

Thanks for the link, Susan. My oldest is going to be a teen in less than two years. I'm going to make sure my husband read it, especially for when my daughter becomes a teen.

Diane said...

It is definitely a mystery at times. Even now looking back I can remember all those weird thoughts and wishing I had half the knowledge I have now. :O)

Jessie Oliveros said...

I liked most of the article. My children are small still, but I remember being a teenager. I give my four year-old rules now, which I believe offers a sense of borders and security. I felt the same way about my parents "rules" and expectations as a teenager. There was something stable. I knew what to expect. I don't like, for example, the idea of changing your pre-assigned dating age and compromising just because your daughter may be sneaking around.

Having said that, I thought it was good insight into a teenage mind, and like I said-most of the advice rang true. I think it all amounts to communicating and listening to your teenager. And starting before they are teenagers.

T. Anne said...

I agree, any insight into your target market is worth its weight in gold!

Kim Kasch said...

Wait a minute. . . you mean my kids think?

That's a new one...ha-ha

Name: Holly Bowne said...

That's so funny! Just before I stopped by your site I read an article on Parade.com about the teen brain. This was interesting too, hearing the kids' perspectives. Thanks so much for sharing!